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Rio+20 – the Green Initiative.


The statement from Paul Simpson, CDP’s Chief Executive Officer reads;

….. as we approach the Rio+20 Earth Summit, which will focus heavily on how to account for the way businesses use the planet’s natural capital. Investors and corporations are becoming increasingly aware of the extent to which their value chains are influenced by natural resource constraints which lead to increasing price volatility and risk of business interruption. CDP has pioneered a global disclosure system that helps businesses understand and value the current and future impacts from a changing climate and natural resource scarcity, as the world seeks to move towards a sustainable economy.

Forests provide essential ecosystem services that underpin our well being and economic prosperity and their destruction contributes around 15% of global carbon emissions. The issues of energy, climate change, water and forests should not be considered in isolation as all are inextricably linked. Having this information in one place will encourage and facilitate joined up thinking on the subject.

Making climate finance an effective driver of sustainable development, is now the most important subject that needs a through discussion, it was observed at the side events in the run up to Rio+20 Summit – on the 13th June that, Climate finance could become a powerful driver of sustainable development. By supporting mitigation, adaptation and capacity building, it can help build the governmental, social, economic and physical infrastructures needed to achieve poverty reduction and green economy growth. However, without concerted efforts to strengthen the governance of climate financing, these goals will remain elusive.

Presently climate money is channelled through a complex network of public and private institutions, where decision-making can be opaque and unaccountable, and independent oversight absent or under-funded. This heightens the risk of policy capture, mismanagement or corruption; all serious impediments to the Rio+20 agenda. Fiduciary standards such as those espoused by the GEF represent an important attempt to safeguard climate financing against abuse. Transparency, accountability and ethics are fundamental. But what are the challenges to implementing and enforcing these safeguards? And what are the best practice scenarios we can learn from?

The Rio+20 conference comes at a critical time in the development of climate finance governance. This year the global Green Climate Fund will enter into operation, once key decisions are taken over its governance structures. In 2012, OECD countries will also have to deliver on outstanding fast-track climate finance commitments, meaning billions of US dollars should enter circulation before December. Given the potential volumes involved and the relatively untested nature of its institutional framework, climate finance must be treated as a new and emerging challenge’, distinct from development aid. The Rio+20 outcome document currently under negotiation is missing this link.

World leaders have a chance at Rio+20 to stop subsidizing fossil fuels to the tune of nearly $1 trillion and make an important dent in reducing global warming.

English: CSR approaches CSR framework

English: CSR approaches CSR framework (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The above statements which I have gathered together, shows that there is a lot of movement towards actually having a GEF which can make the desired positive change towards climate change. But what is most important is to have CSR mandatory, in India we are having a lot of buzz around the Government proposal of making CSR mandatory with both FICCI and CII opposing it. Before we understand in depth the reason for this opposition, let us put on record that nearly 16% of the top 100 listed companies in India are already having an  CSR policy in place.

Now how many from the 16% are actually into People -Planet -Profit the 3 bottom line, which should make the baseline of any CSR is not known.

Authenticity in Corporate Social Responsibility

Authenticity in Corporate Social Responsibility (Photo credit: Geoff Livingston)

Corporate will do anything in which they see value. So when we speak of  CSR, and CDP would be seen as such; we must be able to actually gauge which corporate is actually  utilizing Community resources, and giving back to the People and Planet over and above what it must. Because more often than not, the mandatory obligation such as rehabilitating the project affected people, say from a mining site or a hydro-power project is passed on as CSR.  So the danger lies in the CDP being used for market study of a corporate to understand its future business plans and passed on as CSR.

Another, danger is that we are already seeing a lot of commitment  based  on absent funds, especially in relation to solutions which have a direct bearing to climate change. There are Governments which in one hand declaring a financial crisis and on the other hand committing Millions for Climate change mitigation. How are both possible ? At Rio+20 we must keep our hearing sharp to understand fact from fiction.

Having said that, we all know that Peoples are interested in mitigation and adaptation to climate change. And this may be somewhat possible even without “money” as we understand the term. My suggestion would be that policy makers around the World can sit down and list product and process which they have in excess and find a system to barter that advantage with other Nations who have a deficit of the same. Thus some of the commitments which otherwise would have required money and man-power can be overcome. The idea is to look at “profit” from all-together different perspective and thus give a new meaning to the “triple bottom line”.

 

 

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Save Petroleum form Extinction – Save Earth !


Mean surface temperature change for 1999–2008 ...

Mean surface temperature change for 1999–2008 relative to the average temperatures from 1940 to 1980 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Petroleum products Nylon zippers, ballet tights,plastic hangers, pantyhose, permanent press clothing, flip flops/thongs, fake fur, polyester clothing, ball point pens ink, computer diskettes, computers copiers, magic markers, telephones, microfilm, cameras, earphones, footballs, knitting needles, tennis racquets, golf balls,  stuffed animals, band aids, Vaseline, rubbing alcohol, Pepto-Bismol hair colouring, soap, cough syrup, hair spray, lipstick, denture, adhesives, egg cartons, candles, wax paper, nylon spatulas, Teflon pans, Formica linoleum, garden hoses, plungers,  floor wax, Plexiglas, balloons, CDROMs, check book covers, video cassettes, credit cards, dice, watch bands, Plastic furniture… If I recycle these and don’t use…Petrol, Diesel, Kerosene, LPGAnti-freeze, trash bags, shopping bags, spray paint, freezer bags, plastic bottles (Each year, 1.5 million barrels of oil go to making plastic water bottles used in the United States. Less than 25% are recycled)….I get to save Petroleum. I reduce Global Warming and save the petroleum for more productive use than burning it all up or thrashing it to fill up land-fills.

Climate_Change_Attribution_fr

Climate_Change_Attribution_fr (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

So will Rio+20 UNFCCC meet think about these? Create awareness? If it needs to convince the World to turn around and reverse the 3.5°C rise in temperature, it needs to think and think from the view point of how to save our most precious resource, petroleum.

The one and only Petroleum, which helped us move away from wearing the Shakespearian tights to the colourful nylon stockings. Thus heralding the modern era, where we no more die of charcoal fumes but coal, petrol, nuclear etc a whole mix of deadly fumes as it helped in quantum jump of the Industrial revolution. If that is not progress, what is ?

On a more sombre note; More than six billion men, women and children will inhabit urban areas around the world in 2050 when the global population would have surged to nine billion, putting stress on the natural resources that supply energy and food. The Earth resources are finite, be it Land, Potable water or Forest cover and the minerals which are trapped under the forest cover. And it does not take a genius to understand that per capita profit is directly related to the amount of product and produce you have for trade.

Therefore, in the Rio+20 summit, let us not talk about Global Warming and Climate change and how important it is to abate it to ensure survival of civilization. But how profits world over would dip, if resource management is not taken up on an urgent basis.

It would be wise for the OPEC countries to stop selling crude to the Gasoline manufacturers but demand a long-term business relation with Plastic furniture manufacturer, Nylon makers and other petroleum by-product manufacturers and demand a premium. (and a hefty sum from all the air-borne paratroopers who need a plastic cloth to bail them out during emergencies or when they drop down on foreign soil to create an emergency for the ruling dispensation).

OPEC kind of controls the fate of Dell, Apple, Nokia, Victoria Secrets,Vaseline et all; if OPEC does not offer them the plastic they so need how can they profit? Therefore if OPEC ask for guarantees that their crude would not be burnt up into thin smoke but used to create the various by products they would profit more. Once the datum of the raw material changes, its value proposition at source would increase. So it can obviously make more profit and at the same time the OPEC Nations can bask in the glory of creating the Messiah solution for saving Earth from GHG induced Climate change. At least a major part.

And this would automatically give a fillip to renewable energy and bio-fuel industry too; which can finally take up its rightful place as the real energy providers in terms of electrical generation and transportation fuel.

Therefore it is not necessary for climate supporters to fight the coal and petroleum lobby but make popular through sustained information the by-products of petroleum and coal which very few people give a thought to and ask them what they prefer most. To burn up this precious substance or make maximum use of the by-products; many of which have a fair chance of recycle and reuse.

It would be prudent for all to understand that the modern life-style we are so comfortable with would vanish with the depletion of Coal & Petroleum. Products we take for granted would not come by cheap and plenty. It is therefore the need of the hour for the Citizens of every Nation to understand the challenges. Lastly this article only covers just two products which with their finite limit, can cause so much discomfort. We are yet to find out how to feed 9 Billion with food and water and then find them shelter!

All religion says 9 times God came to earth…. will we make it to 10 Billion? Or Extinction stares at the face.

Save Petroleum from Extinction – Save your Business with a Green Idea (oyeta936.wordpress.com)

 

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Green Business Ideas : P.M.Manmohan Singh’s idea of Terminal Market Complex is a superb Green Idea which needs to be implemented


The Prime Minister of India 2012

The National Action Plan on Climate Change (NAPCC) was released by the Prime Minister of India on 30th June 2008.It outlines a national strategy that aims to enable the country adapt to climate change and enhances the ecological sustainability of India‘s development path. It stresses that maintaining a high growth rate is essential for increasing living standards of the majority of people of India and reducing their vulnerability of the impacts of climate change.

During that time he also reinforced the idea of Terminal Market Complex – to combat food waste due to transportation & storage problems. The detailed report must have been read and perhaps being implemented too. But in this I found a Green Business Idea which perhaps can bring a sea-change in the thoughts of Climate Resilient Cities we need to build.

The idea of Terminal Market Complex conforms to Agenda 21 and the C40 cities program if we can design it right in the heart of a city. Yes, it is possible. It is very similar to a  concept which I found in a recent article, published by NDRC blog and tagged under urban farming, an old building was transformed into a public garden. The concept of Multileveled Vertical Urban Allotments, has been designed by Aspiring interior designer Lucie Sadakova, and another addition to superlative concepts many other Architects and Designers world over, are coming up with. The combination of each idea together I hope, would help rid the problems all Urban areas in the World are facing. It is a super step towards creating the Climate Resilient Cities.

Most Indian urban centers, especially cities like Mumbai, India; face severe shortage of space.This lead to shrinking of open spaces, trees and green patch in general. Making do with a few potted plants, hanging out of tiny windows or narrow flower-beds never can compare to a beautiful park in full bloom and surrounded with shady trees. The absence or shortage of open green spaces is harmful to the health of citizens; it raises the overall temperature of the city, which is known as heat island effect and both physical & psychological problems arise due to such unplanned development. What is more worrying is the rapid pace at which urban centers in the Emerging economies like India are growing. With slow or zero pace of reforms initiated by the policy makers, we are heading towards disaster which the PM and his Planning commission has been able to see, but not been able to address as it should have. The main reason behind the government not being able to have a sound Urban Development rule, is more political than administrative. And I strongly believe that should one take an issue which is important for the well-being of the citizens to the citizens directly, it would get mass support. And in a Democracy, mass support is the best driver for implementation of good governance.

Next, if the idea could have the possibility of generating income, its popularity would rise faster. Let us in this article explore a few ideas and see if sound, innovative and transparent policy and public will & participation can make them popular for all those cities which need to return to sustainable growth.

Mumbai, is the commercial hub of India. Here we have people who have wealth which could buy them a palace in many other urban centers around the world, but here they make do with a high-rise apartment due to severe lack of space. And almost all the financially well-off  citizens, have a second home. Locations at a distance of 100 KM to 150 KM from the city center are most popular. There you would find beautiful bungalows, with lawns in front and kitchen garden at the back; vast farm-houses fenced and barricaded. These houses lie vacant for most of the year and those of the super-rich, for years; because they have other similar abode near other cities .So  most are left in care of  a man-servant and his family who also double up as the gardener, housekeeping and guard. While I have absolutely no issues, if poor underprivileged villagers are provided with a decent shelter and employment, I do have strong reservations on this type of growth of ‘second homes’ which usually come up on, especially near Mumbai; ecologically sensitive western ghats. The primary reason for this type of growth is because the rich citizen of Mumbai want to ‘get away’ form all the heat and dust of everyday living.This is the pulse, which the Developers and the Urban Development Ministry failing to cash on. A bold and unusual  Green Business Idea, which if implemented and  made a success, could change the way people live in Cities.

If say, we can provide lush-green abode at the heart of the city along with the option of fresh food terminals which reduce food waste and generate employment we are able to create a super sustainable city program. And the best part would be it would reduce the heat-island effect. Limit the horizontal growth of a city, which we call an Urban sprawl, which eats up more and more green field areas, pushing the farm lands further away from the city center, this creating logistical problems for storage and transportation of  fresh food. Further a direct connect with nature would insure that the future generations would not be divorced form sustainable living practices as we are in the present.

Terrace garden are nothing new. But if with policy support from the government the free FSI / FAR  is tweaked to help the developers who are able to build high-rise, with a kitchen – garden along with lawns & flower beds, imagine the result. It would be like living in a bungalow in the clouds! The hanging gardens of Babylon coming back to life. True, the kitchen garden would not be able to supply the demand required. But that is not the point. The point is it would be an extra support to the terminal market complex we could be building, which is additional to the thought given by the ministry and similar to the hollowed out building shown alongside. And where is the space one would ask ? Just look at any of the large Bus Depots in Mumbai, and imagine having 20 stories of light-weight structure made of Thermo-Polymerized rock  , say 12 meters wide floor plate stacked one over the other at distances and design which allow for sunlight. Not only would such roof-top or terrace fields help in the agribusiness, it would save the fertile topsoil of farmlands from being destroyed by the ever growing foot-print of the concrete jungle.

What a relief it would be for a  tired office goer to alight from the bus which are parked under the shade of this bus-terminal-cum-food-terminal, go to the co-operative vegetable mart and buy vegetables before heading home. And all those vegetable sellers, blocking the foot-path along the suburban rail stations and over-bridges could be shifted and even provided with space perhaps at the first floor level, to do what they do best. Sell and grow vegetables. The marginalized farmer who having lost his land need no more live a life of indignity by begging but instead, work under a government aided program to farm and perhaps even get employment with private city center farms, as explained below.

Malls usually have huge floor plate and therefore huge roof area, which get super hot during the summer, requiring a lot of energy for air-conditioning. Mall roofs too could be designed to have vegetable gardens similar to the image shown.  It is a logical idea, as these usually also have the supermarket where people go to buy their grocery. While I concede that all the ideas are Utopian, I believe that someday somewhere I would be able to make a township with these very ideas and more. In 2009 during the Vishwa Show in Mumbai, I had got a whole three-minute to speak with my hero, the past President of India, Shri A.P.J Abdul Kalam. I spoke to him about my idea of building a CDM complaint township, adopting my idea from another Great Leader of India, Shri Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi. Gram Swaraj or village self-rule, was a pivotal concept in Mahatama Gandhi’s thinking. I happened to read his ideas and was so mesmerized by his thinking that today the concept I have visualized is nothing but pure inspiration. All Dr. Kalam said  post hearing me out was, as it is a Gandhian idea, it would be a success!

Note : I thank all whose images I have found and used from the internet. None of the concepts shown are my own, and I give full credit to those who have been able to think these ideas, as they are inspirational.

 

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The USA has given some of the top inventions to abate Climate Change.


Twelve countries accounted for nearly 90% of clean-tech inventions between 2000 and 2005, according to an analysis of the E.U.’s World Patent Statistical Database conducted by the economists Matthieu Glachant and Antoine Dechezleprêtre. Of those 12 countries, just three accounted for 60% of patent awards: Japan, the United States and Germany. As reported by William Pentland in the Eco-Tech section of Forbes in 2006.

When it comes to the wager about who can save Earth when the last call for saving the planet is given in 2017, U.S.A would be where I would put my money.

Not because they love Mother Earth more than any other Nation, they simply love to live life large size and for this reason alone they would help stop any event which could spoil their party.  While its true that Industrial Revolution started in Europe, it’s the Americans who taught the world how to pollute in style. A 20 tonnes of CO2e per head ! Wow.

From the automobiles, to airplanes. From telephone, to super large TV  to VoIP. From high-tech  homes which can communicate, to Skyscrapers, a simple sandwich to a fat hamburger;  the United States of America, depending on which side you’re, has fortunately or unfortunately created or popularized or exported around the world, everything with so much hype and business acumen that everyone ( let’s agree to tell the truth to ourselves) wants to live like an American.

In the bargain it has encouraged either by omission or commission a stupendous climate problem for Earth. Now, the World loves to deride USA for the high carbon life-style, yet paradoxically we all try to ape the very same and call it “our right to develop”.

In the past one month while researching for the various articles I’ve posted under “Green Business Ideas”, I became more aware of the various Clean technology field of work in which the USA has worked.   What most of us outside that Country do not know is that, there are two Americas. One the United States of America, which is run by proxy by the big oil & coal corporates. And then  the made in USA. Run by the very same people who made the brand USA.

The 2011 Cleantech Open Awards, a non-profit organization, has been rewarding entrepreneurs that espouse clean technology for six years running, reported that to date, 593 companies in the United States alone have finished the entrepreneurship programs of Cleantech Open, which in turn raised funding for an excess of $500 million.

These are astute businessmen, people whose hard work and perseverance made the Country a Super power. And some among them REALLY care about the Ecosystem.

So what is it that is stopping the USA from signing the legally binding treaty on Climate change control? About two year back I had heard Andrew Light, Senior Fellow at American Progress specializing in international climate and science policy, and a professor at George Mason University, when he was in India and a co-panelist at the Indian Business School, Powai, Mumbai. What he was trying to explain that the American people do not see fossil fuel, such as coal & oil; agent for global warming rather as pollution. And this is the reason White House can not sign a treaty so easily. I have immense respect for a person of that stature and do understand he would have a more in-depth knowledge about his Country.

During my interaction with him later, at the American Center, in the evening I had mentioned to him, that the World would always look up to a Leader. Whether we acknowledge it or not, as of now the USA is still considered the leading World economy which would find out a way out of these uncertain times.

In my opinion, it should be the various Climate experts both NGO’s and individual clean tech businessperson who should come together and clearly demonstrate the job opportunities as opposed to job loss to the public in America and thus create a conducive atmosphere to help Washington take the right policy step.

Once this happens, the BRIC or BASIC countries would be the first to benefit from the right technology transfer at a price that they can afford. Which in turn would help Clean technology to grow at a faster pace and percolate down to the underdeveloped Nations, bringing prosperity for all.

 

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Climate change – the most significant emerging risks facing the world today


Climate change

Climate change—often referred to as “global warming”—is one of the most significant emerging risks facing the world today, presenting tremendous challenges to the environment, to the world economy, and to individual businesses. It is also one of the most difficult risks to mitigate. This is a complex global issue at the intersection of science, risk, and public policy.

Ceres which directs the Investor Network on Climate Risk, a group of 78 institutional investors from the U.S., Europe, and Canada who collectively manage over $7 trillion in assets. In an annual report has noted that, despite the financial crisis, a growing number of political, financial and business leaders are calling for immediate action to drastically reduce global warming pollution. Climate change related catastrophic losses in 2008 to the economy were the third highest ever , exceeding $200 billion globally in 2008, including $40 billion in losses from Hurricanes Ike and Gustav in the U.S. alone, according to global insurer Munich Re. Climate trends are creating risks on both sides of the insurance house—underwriting and investment. But these trends also create vast opportunities, from product innovation to investment alpha, for insurers to be part of the global warming solution. For the first time, fighting climate change is seen not just as a long-term imperative but also as a short-term stimulus for a struggling economy. Property insurance companies are driving the majority of the activity (home owner, commercial, and auto)For the first time, two insurers, Zurich and Liberty Mutual, have introduced directors and officers’ coverage specifically tailored to address liability risks associated with climate change.

◆ Almost all of the climate-related innovations in liability insurance for directors and officers, political risk, professional liability, and environmental liability have appeared in the past year. Both Zurich and Liberty Mutual launched products specifically designed to cover boards of directors in the event of climate change litigation, a significant development given pending lawsuits that could allocate significant costs to major emitters of greenhouse gases.

The business risks from climate change include:
• the strong threat of increasingly volatile weather conditions,
• rising sea levels, and new health impacts;
• resulting impacts on insurance markets, business resources,
• personnel, and corporate preparedness;
• increasing legal and regulatory pressures; and
• mounting public and shareholder activism.

Therefore Climate change—and how to respond to it—is not “yet another” issue for insurers. It is, rather, bound up in the very fabric of the industry and its business environment, namely:
◆ Loss-model accuracy
Regulation
◆ Balance sheet strength, risk-based capital, and solvency
◆ Competitiveness
Emerging markets
◆ Reputation & trust
◆ Customer retention
◆Corporate governance, investor relations, and disclosure

Litigation Risks from climate change include:
With a growing perception among the public, government officials, and businesses that climate change causes damage, the likelihood increases that lawsuits may be filed against those believed to contribute to the buildup of GHGs. Companies could find themselves embroiled in courtroom battles on a number of fronts.

Reputation Risks:
Health risks: Climate change also poses a threat through potential impacts on the spread of diseases. A recent study by Harvard Medical School, for example, concluded that rising temperatures and extreme weather affect the breeding and spread of disease vectors such as mosquitoes that carry malaria and ticks that carry Lyme disease. Rising temperatures may also increase the growth of ragweed pollen and cause a rise in the incidence of asthma, according to the 2005 study. Air pollution could also worsen in some areas, with a related rise in respiratory illnesses. The economic consequences in terms of cost to company and government health plans could be significant.
Although most consumers do not currently consider climate change to be a front-burner issue, it is likely to become a mainstream consumer concern by 2010, according to Brand Value at Risk From Climate Change, a study conducted by the Carbon Trust with Lippincott Mercer, a Marsh sister company. In part, climate change will gain visibility among consumers in the coming years through the impacts of media reports on severe weather, increased regulations, political debate, and an increase in products marketed as climate-friendly. A number of companies from a range of industries are already promoting themselves as environmentally friendly and, specifically, climate change-friendly.

Regulatory Risk from Climate change:
As government agencies and world bodies put regulations in place limiting emissions, enforcement action can be expected against companies found not to be in compliance.
Such companies may then face significant costs from fines or from fighting against the regulations—or against allegations of having violated them—in court.

Risk from Shareholders:
Lawsuits from shareholders could centre on whether a company suffered financially due to a lack of planning for climate risks by directors. For example, it’s conceivable that a power company may choose to do nothing to limit emissions, and then the federal government could pass legislation requiring CO2 limits. Companies that had not prepared for the possibility could find themselves at a disadvantage to competitors that did prepare.

Competitiveness Risks:
A company that manages the above risks—physical, regulatory, shareholder, litigation, and reputation—more effectively than others in its industry may gain a competitive advantage. For example, if a manufacturing firm undertakes a comprehensive effort to reduce its energy consumption, it may significantly reduce energy costs, discover ways to streamline its processes, exceed shareholder expectations, and project a positive environmental image. Many companies are now aggressively developing new products as part of environmentally friendly strategies.

Corporate need to;
• understand and assess their exposures to natural hazards;
• analyze infrastructure damage;
• identify the need for upgrades to buildings and business practices; and
• obtain advice on risk-reduction measures.

Note: The article has been condensed from various prestigious publications & condensed for easy reading.

 

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Climate Change and Finance in India: Banking on the low carbon Indian economy


In January 2009, a roundtable discussion for CEOs of financial institutions, convened by The Climate Group, concluded that there was an imminent need for engagement with the Indian Banks’ Association (IBA) and a larger cross section of banks to raise awareness on climate change. This report emerged from a meeting in late 2009, when The Climate Group initiated dialogue with the banks operating in India to discuss the most effective ways to tackle climate change.

The Climate Group and the IBA agreed to produce a report outlining best practice in the finance industry in India and recommend action that banks can take to accelerate a low carbon economy. Working with PricewaterhouseCoopers, a survey was carried out to gather this information.

Amongst the report’s most important conclusions are:

  • A small number of banks are initiating change
    There is a small group of banks in India that are leading the sector in tackling climate change and that recognize the commercial advantage this will provide. Energy efficiency is one key focus, with an estimated market worth more than US$15 billion by 2015.
  • Taking advantage of policy
    The action being taken by banks is no longer limited to reducing operational emissions – it is focused on taking advantage of domestic and international climate change policy and frameworks, such as the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) and India’s National Action Plan on climate change, to open new markets.
  • Success means tackling climate change
    Four banks rated climate change as ‘very important’ and in the ‘Top Ten Priorities Critical to Success’. However, public sector banks are less involved in voluntary initiatives and appear to be postponing action until regulation is in place.
  • Leadership role
    Seven of the eight banks believe that commercial lending banks in India can play a leadership role in the business community in addressing the challenges of climate change. Banks indicate that integrating sustainable development into the organization’s policies and management approach improves morale of employees and provides a strong and confident long-term relationship with stakeholders.
  • Financial incentives
    Banks are increasingly aware of the opportunities that are available to stimulate investment – such as through low carbon funds. However, the correct financial incentives are essential to make this a reality and the banks need to proactively engage with the Government in India to ensure that the right incentives are in place.

This report is intended as a resource for illustrating the existing scope of climate change activities by banks.

Courtesy: theclimategroup

 

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